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Integrated Pest Management

National Roadmap for Integrated Pest Management

The National Roadmap for Integrated Pest Management (IPM Roadmap) identifies strategic directions for IPM research, implementation, and measurement for all pests, in all settings, throughout the nation. This includes pest management for all areas including agricultural, structural, ornamental, turf, museums, public and wildlife health pests, and encompasses terrestrial and aquatic invasive species.

The development of a national roadmap to address IPM issues began in 2002.  Continuous input from numerous IPM experts, practitioners, and stakeholders resulted in the adoption of the May 17, 2004, IPM Roadmap.  The goal of the IPM Roadmap is to increase nationwide communication and efficiency through information exchanges among federal and non-federal IPM practitioners and service providers, including land managers, growers, structural pest managers, and public and wildlife health officials.

National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) staff provided leadership in the development of the roadmap, along with other members of the Federal IPM Coordinating Committee.  Eldon Ortman co-chaired the effort with Agricultural Research Service staff member Harold Coble.  NIFA IPM National Program Leaders Mike Fitzner, Dennis Kopp, and Rick Meyer  participated in the effort.  Applicants to NIFA funding programs that address IPM issues should use the goals of the roadmap as a guide when designing projects and reporting impacts.  The goals include: 

  • improving cost benefit analyses when adopting IPM practices;
  • reducing potential human health risks from pests and related management strategies; and
  • minimizing adverse environmental effects from pests and related management strategies.

 

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