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Federal Assistance

NIFA supports the base programs of state Agricultural Experiment Stations and the Cooperative Extension System nationwide at land-grant universities. As USDA's primary extramural research agency, NIFA provides working funds to researchers at institutions of higher education all over the United States. These research programs benefit all Americans.

NIFA helps ensure that a high-quality higher education infrastructure will be available at the nation's land-grant universities to address national needs, and it uses the infrastructure of scientific expertise from these and other colleges and universities, and also of public and private laboratories, to partner in addressing national priorities.

NIFA administers federal appropriations through the three basic funding mechanisms below: For more detailed information see NIFA Federal Assistance Programs.

  • Competitive Grants: NIFA awards competitive grants for fundamental and applied research, extension, and higher education activities, as well as for projects that integrate research, education and extension functions. Competitive programs enable NIFA to attract a large pool of applicants to work on agricultural issues of national interest, and to select the highest quality proposals submitted by highly qualified individuals, institutions or organizations. Awards are made following a rigorous peer-review process. Eligibility, administrative rules, and procedures vary for each specific program according to authorizing statutes

  • Formula Grants: NIFA provides funds for research and extension to land-grant institutions (1862, 1890 and 1994 institutions), schools of forestry and schools of veterinary medicine through several formula program authorities. The amount of funds provided to each institution is determined by formula, often statutorily defined, that may include variables such as the rural population, farm population, and poverty. Local or regional university leaders and in some cases, the governor, decides which specific projects will be supported by an institution’s formula grant allotment. These decisions are informed, in part, by stakeholders who both conduct and use agricultural research and extension.

  • Non-competitive Grant Programs: Some projects are authorized by Congress to specifically support a designated institution or set of institutions for particular research, education or extension topics of importance to a state or region. These projects are supported through Special Research Grants or Direct Federal Administration Research or Extension Grants

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COMPETITIVE GRANTS

1890 Facilities Grants Program. 7 U.S.C. 3222b. The 1890 Facilities Grants Program provides funds for the acquisition and improvement of agricultural and food sciences facilities and equipment, including libraries, so that the 1890 land-grant institutions, Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University, may participate fully in the production of human capital in the food and agricultural sciences. Eligible applicants are the 1890 land-grant institutions, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University (7 U.S.C. 3222b(a)(1)).

Contact: P.S. Benepal
CFDA Number:10.216

1890 Institutions Teaching, Research, and Extension Capacity Building Grants. 7 U.S.C. 3152 (b)(4). The 1890 Capacity Building Grants are intended to strengthen teaching, research, and extension in the food and agricultural sciences by building the institutional capacities of the 1890 land-grant institutions, Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University through cooperative linkages with federal and non-federal entities.  Applications may only be submitted by 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University, including  research foundations maintained by an eligible institution (7 U.S.C. 3152(d)). These competitively awarded projects strengthen teaching and research in targeted areas of the food and agricultural sciences.

Contact: Edwin Lewis
CFDA Number: 10.216

Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI). 7 U.S.C. 450i(b). Section 7406 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (FCEA) (Pub. L. 110-246) amends section 2(b) of the Competitive, Special, and Facilities Research Grant Act (7 U.S.C. 450i(b)) to authorize the Secretary of Agriculture to establish the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI); a competitive grant program to provide funding for fundamental and applied research, education, and extension to address food and agricultural sciences. Grants shall be awarded to address priorities in United States agriculture in the following areas:

1.         Plant health and production and plant products;
2.         Animal health and production and animal products;
3.         Food safety, nutrition, and health;
4.         Renewable energy, natural resources, and environment;
5.         Agriculture systems and technology; and
6.         Agriculture economics and rural communities.

To the maximum extent practicable, the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), in coordination with the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics (REE), will make grants for high priority research, education, and extension, taking into consideration, when available, the determinations made by the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board (NAREEEAB) pursuant to section 2(b)(10) of the Competitive, Special, and Facilities Research Grant Act (7 U.S.C. 450i(b)(10)), as amended. The authority to carry out this program has been delegated to NIFA through the Under Secretary for REE.

The purpose of AFRI is to support research, education, and extension work by awarding grants that address key problems of national, regional, and multi-state importance in sustaining all components of agriculture, including farm efficiency and profitability, ranching, renewable energy, forestry (both urban and agroforestry), aquaculture, rural communities and entrepreneurship, human nutrition, food safety, biotechnology, and conventional breeding. Through this support, AFRI advances knowledge in both fundamental and applied sciences important to agriculture. It also allows AFRI to also support education and extension activities that deliver science-based knowledge to people, allowing them to make informed practical decisions. This AFRI RFA is announcing anticipated funding opportunities for Extension, and Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Projects.

Supporting the many components of agriculture under the constraints of a growing population, pressure on natural resources, and the challenges of climate variability and change, requires research, education, extension, and integrated programs that increase agricultural and natural resource sustainability. The term ''sustainable agriculture'' (NARETPA, 7 U.S.C. 3103) means an integrated system of plant and animal production practices having a site-specific application that will over the long-term achieve the following goals: 1) Satisfy human food and fiber needs; 2) Enhance environmental quality and the natural resource base upon which the agriculture economy depends; 3) Make the most efficient use of nonrenewable resources and on-farm resources and integrate, where appropriate, natural biological cycles and controls; 4) Sustain the economic viability of farm operations; and 5) Enhance the quality of life for farmers and society as a whole.

The National Research Council Committee on Twenty-First Century Systems Agriculture recently updated and simplified this definition as a four-part goal: satisfy human food, feed, and fiber needs and contribute to biofuel needs; enhance environmental quality and the resource base; sustain the economic viability of agriculture; and enhance the quality of life for farmers, farm workers, and society as a whole. The Committee states that progress toward these goals will require robust systems which adapt to and continue to function in the face of stresses, are productive, use resources efficiently, and balance all four goals across all scales of farms and enterprises. They further state that if the U.S. is to maintain adequate resources to meet food, feed, fiber, and biofuel needs, progress toward meeting the four goals must be accelerated. This acceleration must be based on research that determines ways to reduce tradeoffs and enhance synergies among the four goals while managing risks associated with their pursuit. The Committee’s 2010 report, Toward Sustainable Agricultural Systems in the 21st Century, provides a review of the contributions of farming practices and systems and fields of science that elaborates on these general goals with respect to many of the specific priorities within AFRI programs.

Contact: Deborah Sheely
CFDA Number: 10.310

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Alaska-Native Serving and Native-Hawaiian Serving Institutions Education Grants.
7 U.S.C. 3242. This program promotes and strengthens the ability of Alaska Native-Serving Institutions and Native Hawaiian-Serving Institutions to carry out education, applied research, and related community development within a broadly defined arena of food and agricultural sciences-related disciplines. Eligible applicants are individual public or private, nonprofit Alaska Native-Serving and Native Hawaiian-Serving Institutions of higher education that meet the definitions of Alaska Native-Serving Institution or Native Hawaiian-Serving Institution established in Title III, Part A of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (7 U.S.C. 3156(a)(1)).

Contact: Saleia Afele-Faamuli
CFDA Number: 10.228

Aquaculture Centers. 7 U.S.C. 3322. Authorizes the establishment of aquaculture research, development and demonstration centers in the United States for the performance of aquaculture research and extension work and demonstration projects.  Funding currently supports five regional aquaculture centers.  Only institutions housing the respective Administrative Centers are eligible to apply (7 U.S.C. 3322(d)). Non-land-grant institutions can serve as regional centers.

Contact: Gary Jensen
CFDA Number: 10.200

Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program (BFRDP). 7 U.S.C. 3319f. The purpose of this program is to support the nation’s beginning farmers and ranchers by making competitive grants to new and established local and regional training, education, outreach, and technical assistance initiatives that address the needs of beginning farmers and ranchers.  To be eligible for a grant under this authority, an applicant must be a collaborative State, tribal, local, or regionally-based network or partnership of public or private entities which may include a State cooperative extension service; a Federal, state, or tribal agency; a community-based and non-government organization; a college or university (including an institution offering associate’s degree) or a foundation maintained by a college or university; or any other appropriate partner (7 U.S.C. 3319f(2)). All awardees are required to provide a 25 percent match in the form of cash or in-kind contributions. For standard BFRDP projects and Education Enhancement projects, the maximum amount of the award is $250,000 per year and the maximum project period is three years.  For the Online Curriculum and Training Clearinghouse, proposals must not exceed more than $300,000 per year for a maximum award period of five years.

Contact: Siva Sureshwaran
CFDA Number: 10.311

Biomass Research and Development Initiative (BRDI). 7 U.S.C. 8108(e). The purpose of this initiative is to competitively award grants to eligible entities to carry out research and development and demonstration of (1) Biofuels and biobased products; and (2) the methods, practices, and technologies, for the production of biofuels and biobased products.  All Research and Development projects under BRDI require awardees to provide a non-Federal share of not less than 20 percent.  Awardees are required to provide a non-Federal share not less than 50 percent for Demonstration Projects under BRDI.  To be eligible for an award, an applicant must be an institution of higher education, a National Laboratory, a Federal research agency, a State research Agency, a private sector entity, a nonprofit organization, or a consortium of two or more of the entities defined in this sentence (7 U.S.C. 8108(e)(5)). NIFA and the Department of Energy jointly administer this program.

Contact: Carmela Bailey
CFDA Number: 10.312

Biotechnology Risk Assessment Research Competitive Grants. 7 U.S.C. 5921 and amended by 7 U.S.C. 7901. The Biotechnology Risk Assessment Grants (BRAG) funds projects that investigate the effects of introducing genetically modified organisms into the environment.  Studies of effects on both managed and natural environments are relevant. The grants are funded through a 2 percent assessment on all USDA-supported biotechnology research.  Eligible applicants include U.S. public or private research or educational institutions or organizations (7 U.S.C. 5921(d)). NIFA and the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) jointly administer the BRAG program.

Contact: Shing F. Kwok
CFDA Number: 10.219

Community Food Projects Competitive Grants. 7 U.S.C. 2034. These grants are funded through the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 and competitively awarded to support the development of Community Food Projects with a one-time infusion of federal dollars to make such projects self-sustaining or to support the development of stand-alone technical expertise and assistance activities. Community Food Projects are designed to meet the food needs of low-income people; increase the self-reliance of communities in providing for their own food need; and promote comprehensive responses to local food, farm and nutrition issues. Eligible applicants include private, nonprofit entities; and, for training and technical assistance, other entities (all applicants may partner with public or private, nonprofit or for-profit entities, including academic or other appropriate professionals, community-based organizations, or local government entities) (7 U.S.C. 2034(c)). For all but training and capacity building projects, there is a matching requirement of 100 percent nonfederal support.

Contact: Jane Clary
CFDA Number: 10.225

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Competitive, Special, and Facilities Research Grant Act. 7 U.S.C. 450i(c)(1)(B). The Competitive, Special, and Facilities Research Grant Act provides authorization in section 450i(c)(1)(B) for special emphasis awards to support research programs. Organizations eligible to participate are: state agricultural experiment stations, 1862 and 1890 land-grant colleges and universities, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University, 1994 land-grant colleges and universities, research foundations established by land-grant colleges and universities, colleges and universities receiving funds under the Act of October 10, 1962 (16 USC 582a et seq.), accredited schools or colleges of veterinary medicine, and the University of the District of Columbia (7 U.S.C. 450i(c)(1)(B)). The following special emphasis programs are currently supported:

CFDA Number: 10.200

  • Critical Agricultural Materials. The Critical Agricultural Materials Act supports the domestic production and manufacture of crop-based materials that are of strategic and industrial importance to benefit the economy, defense and general well-being of the Nation. Such products replace petroleum-based products, and offer opportunities to create new businesses and new markets for agricultural materials. Products of interest are paints, coatings, and adhesives for composites.
    Contact: Carmela Bailey
  • Expert Integrated Pest Management Decision Support System. The purpose of the Expert Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Decision Support System program is to support development of expert systems that help guide, demonstrate and multiply impacts of USDA supported IPM programs.
    Contact: Herb Bolton
  • Global Change/Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program.  The purpose of the GC/UV-B program is to support research which: (1) generates an uninterrupted stream of climatology data; (2) determines mechanisms and symptoms of plant and animal response to ultraviolet radiation and other stressors; and (3) applies tightly integrated models to assess regional and national impacts (both biological and economic) of multiple plant stressors.  The program and network are managed by Colorado State University.
    Contact: Daniel Schmoldt and Luis Tupas
  • Interregional Research Project #4 Minor Crop Pest Management Program (IR-4). The primary goal of the IR-4 program is to provide safe, effective and economical pest management solutions for growers of minor/specialty crops. IR-4 facilitates crop protection by providing expert assistance with product development and registration. Contact: Monte Johnson
  • Potato Breeding Research. The purpose of this grant program is to support potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) research programs that focus on varietal development and testing and potato varieties for commercial production. As used herein, varietal development and testing is research using traditional and biotechnological genetics to develop improved potato varieties. Aspects of evaluation, screening and testing must support variety development.
    Contact:  Liang-Shiou Lin

  • Regional Integrated Pest Management Program. (7 U.S.C. 450i(c)(1)(B))*. The Regional Integrated Pest Management Program supports the continuum of research and extension efforts needed to increase the implementation of IPM methods. The RIPM program supports projects that develop individual pest control tactics, integrate individual tactics into an IPM system, and develop and implement extension and education programs. The program is administered by the land-grant university system's four regional IPM Centers (North Central, Northeastern, Southern, Western) in partnership with NIFA. Organizations eligible to receive Research awards are: state agricultural experiment stations, 1862 and 1890 land-grant colleges and universities, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University, 1994 land-grant colleges and universities, research foundations established by land-grant colleges and universities, colleges and universities receiving funds under the Act of October 10, 1962 (16 USC 582a et seq.), accredited schools or colleges of veterinary medicine, and the University of the District of Columbia (7 U.S.C. 450i(c)(1)(B)).

Organizations eligible to receive Extension awards are: 1862 and 1890 land-grant colleges and universities, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University, and the University of the District of Columbia (7 U.S.C. 343(d)).
Contact: Robert Nowierski
*CFDA Number: 10.200 and 10.500 – Combines Research and Extension in separate awards under a single solicitation.

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Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions. 7 U.S.C. 301 note. The Tribal Colleges Extension Services provides funding to increase extension capacity at the 34 1994 land-grant institutions, and to address special needs, take advantage of important opportunities, and/or demonstrate long-term sustained benefits of extension projects at 1994 land-grant institutions. Funds are awarded on a competitive basis. Applications may be submitted by any of the Tribal colleges and universities designated as 1994 Land-Grant Institutions under the Educational Land-Grant Status Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 301 note.).

Contact: Tim Grosser
CFDA Number: 10.500

Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank. 7 U.S.C. 7642.  The Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD) supports the production of safe foods of animal origin through the development and dissemination of expert-mediated resources supporting prevention and mitigation of violative chemical (drug, pesticide, natural toxins, and environmental contaminant) residues in food animal products.

Contact: Gary Sherman
CFDA Number: 10.500

Higher Education Challenge Grants. 7 U.S.C. 3152(b)(1). Projects supported by Higher Education Challenge Grants address a State, regional, national, or international educational need, involve a creative or non-traditional approach toward addressing that need, encourage and facilitate better working relationships in the university science and education community, as well as between universities and the private sector, and result in benefits that will likely transcend the project duration and USDA support. Eligibility is limited to four-year colleges and universities with programs in the food and agricultural sciences (7 U.S.C. 3152(b)).  A 25 percent non-federal match is required.

Contact:  Greg Smith
CFDA Number: 10.217

Hispanic Serving Institutions Education Grants. 7 U.S.C. 3241. The competitively awarded Hispanic Education Partnership Grants strengthen the ability of Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI) to carry out higher education programs in the food and agricultural sciences; attract outstanding students from underrepresented groups; and produce graduates capable of enhancing the Nation’s food and agriculture scientific and professional workforce. Only public or other non-profit Hispanic-Serving Institutions are eligible to apply for this program (7 U.S.C. 3241). To qualify as a Hispanic-Serving Institution, applicants must at the time of application, have an enrollment of undergraduate full-time equivalent students that is at least 25 percent Hispanic students. For the purposes of this program, the individual branches of a State university system or public system of higher education that are separately accredited as degree granting institutions are treated as separate institutions eligible for awards. Accreditation must be by an agency or association recognized by the Secretary, U.S. Department of Education. Institutions also must be legally authorized to offer at least a two-year program of study creditable toward an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. Separate branches or campuses of a college or university that are not individually accredited as degree granting institutions are not treated as separate institutions. Funded projects address one or more targeted needs: curricula design, materials development and library resources; faculty preparation and enhancement for teaching; instruction delivery systems; scientific instrumentation for teaching; student experiential learning; and student recruitment and retention.

Contact: Irma Lawrence
CFDA Number: 10.223

Integrated Research, Education and Extension Competitive Grants. 7 U.S.C. 7626.  NIFA competitive integrated grants support research, education and extension functions to solve critical agricultural issues, priorities or problems in a broad array of disciplines. All four-year colleges and universities (as defined in 7 U.S.C. 3103(4)) including university research foundations maintained by four-year colleges and universities, 1994 land-grant institutions, and Hispanic-serving agricultural colleges and universities are eligible to compete for NIFA integrated grants (7 U.S.C. 7626(b)). Matching funds may be required under certain circumstances.

CFDA Number: 10.303

  • Water Quality. The goal of the National Integrated Water Quality Program (NIWQP) is to contribute to the improvement of the quality of our Nation’s surface water and groundwater resources through research, education, and extension activities.  Projects funded through this program will work to solve water resource problems by advancing and disseminating the knowledge base available to agricultural, rural and urbanizing communities.  Funded projects should lead to science-based decision making and management practices that improve the quality of the Nation’s surface water and groundwater resources in agricultural, rural, and urbanizing watersheds.
    Contact: Michael O’Neill
  • Conservation Effects Assessment Project. NIFA is one of the lead federal agencies of the Conservation Effects Assessment Projects (CEAP). CEAP is a multi-agency effort to quantify the environmental benefits of conservation practices used by private landowners participating in selected U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) conservation programs. NIFA is primarily participating in the Watershed Assessment Studies component of CEAP and the interagency coordination of CEAP activities through the steering committee. NIFA leads a joint competitive grants program for CEAP with NRCS.
    Contact: Mary Ann Rozum
  • Methyl Bromide Transition Program. This program is designed to support the discovery and implementation of practical pest management alternatives for commodities affected by the methyl bromide phase-out.  The program focuses on short- to medium-term solutions for all commodities at risk using either combinations of presently available technologies or some newly developed practices.
    Contact: Kitty Cardwell
  • Organic Transition Program. This program supports the development and implementation of biologically based pest management practices that mitigate the ecological, agronomic, and economic risks associated with a transition from conventional to organic agricultural production systems.
    Contact: Mary Peet

 

International Science and Education Competitive Grants. 7 U.S.C. 3292b. The International Science and Education Competitive Grants (ISE) support research, extension, and teaching activities that will enhance the capabilities of U.S. colleges and universities to conduct international collaborative research, extension and teaching. All four-year colleges and universities (as defined in 7 U.S.C. 3103(4)) including university research foundations maintained by four-year colleges and universities are eligible to apply. ISE projects enhance the international content of curricula; ensure that faculty work beyond the U.S.; promote international research partnerships; enhance the use and application of foreign technologies in the U.S.; and strengthen the role that colleges and universities play in maintaining U.S. competitiveness.

Contact: Patricia Fulton
CFDA Number: 10.305
 
Multicultural Scholars. 7 U.S.C. 3152(b)(5). These competitive undergraduate scholarship grants are to increase the multicultural diversity in the workforce and meet the increasingly advanced technological needs of the food and agricultural sciences. These competitive grants are open to colleges and universities that confer baccalaureate and Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degrees in food, agricultural and natural resource sciences (7 U.S.C. 3152(b)) The Multicultural Scholars Program is offered annually and supports student scholarship and special experiential learning for eligible Scholars. The goal of the grant program is to increase the number of new and outstanding students from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in the food and agricultural sciences and who pursue and complete baccalaureate or Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degrees, with scientific and professional competence. A 25 percent non-federal match is required.

Contact: Ray Ali
CFDA Number: 10.220

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National Needs Graduate and Postgraduate Fellowship Grants. 7 U.S.C. 3152(b)(6). Grants are awarded to train students for Master’s and/or doctoral degrees and to provide additional postdoctoral training for Fellows who have completed their doctoral degrees in food, agricultural and natural resource sciences.  Grants are open to colleges and universities that confer a graduate degree in at least one targeted expertise shortage area of the food and agricultural sciences and have demonstrable teaching and research competencies in the food and agricultural sciences (7 U.S.C. 3152(b)). This competitive grants program is specifically intended to support stipends for students in graduate degree level and postdoctoral training and for Special International Study or Thesis/Dissertation Research Travel Allowances (IRTA) for eligible Fellows. The goal of the program is to develop intellectual capital to ensure the preeminence of U.S. food and agricultural systems in areas where there is a national need for the development of scientific and professional expertise.

Contact: Ray Ali
CFDA Number: 10.210

Non Land Grant Colleges of Agriculture. 7 U.S.C. 3319i. The Non Land Grant Colleges of Agriculture (NLGCA) grants assist the NLGCA institutions in maintaining and expanding the capacity to conduct education, research, and outreach activities relating to agriculture, renewable resources, and other similar disciplines.

Contact: Greg Smith
CFDA Number: 10.326
 
Organic Agriculture Research and Extension Initiative (OREI). 7 U.S.C. 5925b. The purpose of the initiative is to fund research and/or extension that will enhance organic producers' and processors' abilities to grow and market high-quality organic agricultural products. Priority concerns encompass biological, physical, and social sciences (including economics). Grants are open to colleges and universities, state agricultural experiment stations, as well as federal and private research entities, private organizations or corporations, and individuals and any group consisting of 2 or more entities identified in this sentence (7 U.S.C. 450i(b)(7)). Matching may be required under certain circumstances.

Contact: Steve Smith
CFDA Number: 10.307

Pest Management Alternatives. 7 U.S.C. 450i(c)(1)(A). The purpose of Pest Management Alternatives Program (PMAP) is to provide support for and encourage the development and implementation of integrated pest management (IPM) practices, tactics, and systems for specific pest problems while reducing human and environmental risks. Applications may be submitted by State agricultural experiment stations, all colleges and universities, other research institutions and organizations, Federal agencies, private organizations or corporations, and individuals (7 U.S.C. 450i(c)(1)(A)) .

Contact: Monte Johnson
CFDA Number: 10.200

Policy Research Centers. 7 U.S.C. 3155.  The purpose of Policy Research Centers Grant Program is to support rigorous and comprehensive research and education programs on the impact of public policies and trade agreements on farmers, ranchers, consumers and taxpayers. In addition, proposed research and education programs should be objective, operationally independent, and external to the Federal Government and focus on the effect of public policies and trade agreements specifically on the following emphasis areas: (1) The farm and agricultural sectors (including commodities, livestock, dairy and specialty crops); (2) the environment; (3) rural families, households, and economies; and (4) consumers, food, and nutrition. Research may be either disciplinary or interdisciplinary concerning policy research activities identified above and include activities that (1) quantify implications of public policies and regulations; (2) develop theoretical and research methods; (3) collect, analyze, and disseminate data for policy makers, analysts, and individuals; and (4) develop programs to train future analysts.

Contact: Robin Shoemaker
CFDA Number: 10.200

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Rangeland Research. 7 U.S.C. 3333. The primary purpose of RRP is to provide U.S. agricultural producers, rural landowners, and land managers with integrated science strategies to make informed land management decisions with an emphasis on enhancing the restoration and sustainable integrity of rangelands. Applications may be submitted by land-grant colleges and universities, State agricultural experiment stations, and colleges, universities, and Federal laboratories having a demonstrable capacity in rangeland research, as determined by the Secretary (7 USC 3333(a)(1)).  A 50 percent non-federal match is required.

Contact: James P Dobrowolski
CFDA Number: 10.200

Renewable Resources Extension Act: National Focus Funds. The purpose of the RREA is to provide funds for pilot projects that address emerging forest and rangeland resource issues; have national or regional relevancy; and develop new and innovative projects that can be replicated at other institutions. Applications may be submitted by 1862 and 1890 land-grant institutions (16 U.S.C. 1672(b)).

Contact: Eric Norland
CFDA Number: 10.500

Resident Instruction for Insular Areas. 7 U.S.C. 3363. Competitive grants are awarded for educational capacity building at land-grant universities in the Insular Areas. Eligible entities are Institutions of higher education, as defined in section 101(a) of the Higher Education Act of 1995 (20 U.S.C. 1001(a)), located in an Insular Area and has a demonstrable capacity to carry out teaching and extension programs in the food and agricultural sciences. Individual land-grant colleges and universities, and other institutions that have secured land-grant status through Federal legislation, and which are located in Insular Areas are automatically eligible for awards under the RIIA and DEG grant programs, either as direct applicants or as parties to a consortium agreement (7 U.S.C. 3363 and 20 U.S.C. 1001(a)).

Contact: Gregory Smith
CFDA Number: 10.308

Risk Management Education. 7 U.S.C. 1524. The Risk Management Education (RME) grants provide U.S. agricultural producers with the knowledge, skills and tools needed to make informed risk management decisions for their operations, with the goal of enhancing farm profitability. Grants fund four Regional RME Centers and a risk management education library. The program supports the dissemination of existing risk management tools; and furthers the development of agricultural risk management curricula and materials, the delivery of agricultural RME to producers, and the verification of program impacts. Eligible applicants include public and private entities, including land-grant institutions; Cooperative Extension Services; four-year colleges or universities; Federal, State, and local agencies; nonprofit and for-profit private organizations or corporations (7 U.S.C. 1524(a)(3)(A)).

Contact: Patricia Hipple
CFDA Number: 10.500

Rural Health and Safety Education. 7 U.S.C. 2662(i). The Rural Health and Safety Education Programs focuses on issues related to individual and family health education in one or more of the following areas: 1) healthy living behaviors, family interaction and environmental attributes in rural areas; 2) health literacy and its impact on health status in rural and farm families; and/or 3) related issues of health promotion and health care to rural individuals and families. Applications may be submitted by Land-grant colleges and universities that are eligible to receive funds under the Act of July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301 et seq.), and the Act of August 30, 1890 (7 U.S.C. 321 et seq.), including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and the University of the District of Columbia. Applications may also be submitted by any of the Tribal colleges and universities designated as 1994 Land-Grant Institutions under the Educational Land-Grant Status Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 2662(i)).

Contact: Aida Balsano
CFDA Number: 10.500

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Rural Youth Development. 7 U.S.C. 7630. Rural Youth Development Grants Program is intended to breakdown barriers to participation, especially for rural youth; enhance opportunities for youth involvement in policy and decision-making; create safe and inviting environments for youth activities; and improve access to information and technology. Only the Girl Scouts of the United States of America, the National 4-H Council, the Boy Scouts of America, and the National FFA Organization are eligible to apply (7 U.S.C. 7630(a)).

Contact: Nancy Valentine
CFDA Number: 10.500

Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR). 15 U.S.C. 638. USDA’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program makes competitively awarded grants to qualified small businesses to support the commercialization of high quality, advanced concepts related to important scientific problems and opportunities in agriculture and natural resources.  Grants are made to stimulate technological innovations in the private sector; strengthen the role of small businesses in meeting federal research and developmental needs; increase private sector commercialization of innovations derived from USDA-supported research and development efforts; and fosters participation by women-owned and socially and economically disadvantaged small business firms in technological innovations.  The program is funded through a statutorily mandated assessment of all USDA supported extramural research.  New rules and regulations are currently being developed for the program since SBIR was recently reauthorized by Congress. 

Contact: Charles Cleland
CFDA Number: 10.212

Smith-Lever Special Needs Projects. 7 U.S.C. 343(b) and (c). Special Needs Program is a competitive grants program to State Extension Services at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions to support innovative, education-based approaches to addressing emergency preparedness and specific responses related to natural and man-made disasters. Applications may be submitted with the approval of Extension Directors of 1862 Land-grant Institutions in the 50 states, American Samoa, Guam, Micronesia, Northern Marianas, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands (7 U.S.C. 343(b) and (c)). There is a 100 percent matching requirement for all awards.

Contact:  Bill Hoffman
CFDA Number: 10.500

Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI). 7 U.S.C. 7621. The Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI) is a competitive grant program to solve critical industry issues through research and extension activities.  Specialty crops are defined as fruits and vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, and horticulture and nursery crops including floriculture. Applications may be submitted by Federal agencies, national laboratories, colleges and universities, research institutions and organizations, private organizations or corporations, State agricultural experiment stations, Cooperative Extension Services, individuals, or groups consisting of two or more of these entities (7 U.S.C. 7632(c)).  SCRI will give priority to projects that are multistate, multi-institutional, or trans-disciplinary; and include explicit mechanisms to communicate results to producers and the public. Projects must address at least one of five focus areas: research in plant breeding, genetics, and genomics to improve crop characteristics; efforts to identify and address threats from pests and diseases, including threats to pollinators; efforts to improve production efficiency, productivity, and profitability over the long term; new innovations and technology, including improved mechanization and technologies that delay or inhibit ripening; and methods to prevent, detect, monitor control, and respond to potential food safety hazards in the production and processing of specialty crops.  There is a 100 percent matching requirement for these awards.

Contact: Thomas Bewick and Dan Schmoldt
CFDA Number: 10.309

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Supplemental and Alternative Crops. 7 U.S.C. 7632. The Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (SACC) supports the significant increase of canola crop acreage by the development and testing of superior germplasm, methods of planting, cultivation, harvesting, processing, and transfer of such applied research from experimental sites to on farm practice as soon as practicable. Applications may be submitted by colleges and universities, other Federal agencies, and private sector entities (7 U.S.C. 3319d(c)(3)(F)).

Contact: Shing Kwok
CFDA Number: 10.200

Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE). 7 U.S.C. 5811. SARE works to increase knowledge about and to help farmers and ranchers adopt practices that are profitable, environmentally sound, and beneficial to communities. Competitive grants for sustainable agriculture research and education are awarded by four regional administrative councils. Generally ranging from $60,000 to $150,000, SARE grants fund projects that usually involve scientists, producers and others in an interdisciplinary approach. Many funded projects involve on-farm research trials with crops and/or livestock.  SARE grants also fund education and demonstration projects, including the development of farmer-to-farmer networks. Eligible applicants include land-grant colleges or universities, other universities, State agricultural experiment stations, State cooperative extension services, nonprofit organizations, and individuals with demonstrable expertise, or Federal or State governmental entities (7 U.S.C. 5811(b)).

Contact: Robert Hedberg
CFDA Number: 10.215

Tribal Colleges Research Grants. 7 U.S.C. 301 note. These grants support agricultural research that addresses high priority concerns of tribal, national, or multistate significance. Grants support investigative and analytical studies in the food and agricultural sciences. Funds are awarded on a competitive basis. Applications may be submitted by any of the Tribal colleges and universities designated as 1994 Land-Grant Institutions under the Educational Land-Grant Status Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 301 note.). Grant applications submitted under this program must certify that the research to be conducted will be performed in collaboration with at least one 1862 or 1890 Land-Grant college or university.

Contact: Tim Grosser
CFDA Number: 10.227

Secondary Education, Two-Year Postsecondary Education, and Agriculture in the K-12 Classroom Challenge Grants. 7 U.S.C. 3152(j). Secondary Education, and Two-Year Postsecondary Education, and the K-12 Classroom Challenge Grants Program (SPECA) promotes and strengthens secondary education and two-year postsecondary education in the food and agricultural sciences to ensure a qualified workforce to serve the U.S. food and agricultural science system and to support the current agriculture in the classroom programs for grades K-12 . Applications may be submitted by:  (1) public secondary schools, (2) public or private nonprofit junior and community colleges, (3) institutions of higher education, or (4) nonprofit organizations (7 U.S.C. 3152(j)(1)).  There is a 25 percent matching requirement for all awards.

Contact: Gregory Smith
CFDA Number: 10.226

  • Secondary Education and Two-Year Postsecondary Education. Proposals address targeted need areas of curricula design and instructional materials development; faculty development and preparation for teaching; career awareness; linkages between secondary, 2-year post-secondary, and institutions of higher learning; or education activities promoting diversity in students seeking degrees in agribusiness and agriscience.
  • Agriculture In the K-12 Classroom (AITC). The AITC effort serves nearly 5 million students and 60,000 teachers annually through workshops, conferences, field trips, farm tours, and other educational activities. AITC works with states and supports a variety of projects relating to agricultural literacy. The activities are carried out in each state, according to state needs and interests, by individuals representing farm organizations, agribusiness, education and government.

 

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Smith-Lever Act 3(d). 7 U.S.C. 341 et seq. The Smith-Lever Act provides authorization in section 3(d) for special emphasis awards to support cooperative extension programs. 1862, 1890, and Insular Territory land-grant institutions may compete for and receive Smith-Lever 3(d) funds (7 U.S.C. 343(d)). The following special emphasis programs are currently supported:

CFDA Number: 10.500

  • Federally Recognized Tribes Extension Program. These awards establish extension education programs on Indian Reservations and tribal jurisdictions. The programs are implemented in consultation with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Intertribal Agriculture Council, and the Southwest Indian Agriculture Association. Contact: Tim Grosser
  • Children Youth and Families at Risk (CYFAR). CYFAR supports comprehensive, intensive, community-based efforts developed with active citizen participation. CYFAR promotes building resiliency and protective factors in youth, families, and communities.
    Contact:  Bonita Williams
  • Extension Integrated Pest Management Coordination and Support Program. Extension IPM helps agricultural producers and other pest managers gain confidence in alternative pest management strategies as they are demonstrated and evaluated in production and other settings.
    Contact: Martin Draper
  • Farm Safety. Smith-Lever 3(d) funds support farm safety through National, State and Regional AgrAbility Projects.
    Contact: Bradley Rein
  • Youth Farm Safety and Certification Program. Awards support national efforts to deliver timely, pertinent, and appropriate training to youth seeking employment or already employed in agricultural production.
    Contact: Bradley Rein
  • Sustainable Agriculture. Smith-Lever 3(d) provides funding for Professional Development Grants that support extension outreach projects in coordination with Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education.
    Contact: Robert Hedberg
  • Regional Pest Management Centers. Pest management centers are the focal point for team building efforts, communication networks, and stakeholder participation within a given region.  The centers bring together and help focus the institutional and individual expertise needed to address successfully a range of pest management issues confronting farmers and other pest managers (e.g., regulatory restrictions, development of pest resistance, invasive species, and biotechnology). The land-grant university system's four regional IPM Centers (North Central, Northeastern, Southern, Western) administer the program in partnership with NIFA.
    Contact: Herbert Bolton
  • New Technologies for Agriculture Extension. The purpose of the New Technologies for Ag Extension Program (NTAE) is to increase the capacity of each State to contribute expertise and content to the development of eXtension, a national web-based information and education delivery system that provides direct access to science-based educational resources from land-grant and other partner institutions about subjects of high importance to the general public.
    Contact: Greg Crosby


Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program. 7 U.S.C. 3151a.
The purpose of this program is for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to enter into agreements with veterinarians under which the veterinarians agree to provide, for a specific period of time as identified in the agreement, veterinary services in veterinarian shortage situations (7 U.S.C. 3151a).

Contact: Gary Sherman
CFDA Number: 10.313

Women and Minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Fields Grant Program. 7 U.S.C. 5925(e)(49).

This program supports research and extension projects that have robust collaborations to increase the participation of women and underrepresented minorities from rural areas in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields that are relevant to USDA priorities identified by the Secretary. Applications may be submitted by eligible applicants and may be a collaborative state, tribal, local, or regionally-based network or partnership of public or private entities. Eligible applicants are: (a) State agricultural experiment stations; (b) colleges and universities; (c) university research foundations; (d) other research institutions and organizations; (e) Federal agencies; (f) national laboratories; (g) private organizations or corporations; (h) individuals; or (i) any group consisting of 2 or more of the entities described in subparagraphs (a) through (h) .

Contact: Saleia Afele-Faamuli
CFDA Number: 10.318

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FORMULA GRANTS

1890 Extension Formula Grants. 7 U.S.C. 3221. The 1890 Extension Formula allocates funding according to a statutory formula for agricultural extension programs at the 1890 land-grant institutions, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University. A non-federal match of 100 percent is required, although the Secretary may waive the match above 50 percent if an institution demonstrates that it is unable to meet that requirement.

Contact: P.S. Benepal
CFDA Number: 10.500

1890 Facilities Grants. 7 U.S.C. 3222b. The 1890 Facilities Grants provide funds for the acquisition and improvement of agricultural and food sciences facilities and equipment, including libraries, to 1890 land-grant institutions, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University.

Contact: P.S. Benepal
CFDA Number: 10.500

Animal Health and Disease Research Program. 7 U.S.C. 3195. Funds are allocated according to a statutory formula that takes into account both the importance of the livestock industry and the animal health research capacity within a State. Funding supports livestock and poultry disease research at accredited schools or colleges of veterinary medicine or State Agricultural Experiment Stations that conduct animal health and disease research. The Act limits the annual Federal payment a State may receive in excess of $100,000 to that amount made available and budgeted from nonfederal sources for expenditures on animal health and disease research.

Contact: Gary Sherman
CFDA Number: 10.207

Evans-Allen 1890 Research Formula Grants. 7 U.S.C. 3222. Evans-Allen funds are allocated according to a statutory formula for agricultural research at the 1890 land-grant institutions, including Tuskegee University, and West Virginia State University. A non-federal match of 100 percent is required, although the Secretary may waive the match above 50 percent if an institution demonstrates that it is unable to meet that requirement.

Contact: P.S. Benepal
CFDA Number: 10.205

Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program. 7 U.S.C. 3175. The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is conducted by the 1862 and 1890 land-grant institutions in all 50 states and in American Samoa, District of Columbia, Guam, Micronesia, Northern Marianas, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.  It is designed to assist limited-resource audiences in acquiring the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and changed behavior necessary for nutritionally sound diets, and to contribute to their personal development and the improvement of the total family diet and nutritional well-being.  Funds are distributed according to a statutory formula.

Contact: Helen Chipman
CFDA Number: 10.500

Hatch Act Formula Grants. 7 U.S.C. 361. The Hatch Program allocates federal funds on the basis of a statutory formula to the State Agricultural Experiment Stations of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Insular Areas of Puerto Rico, Guam, Virgin Islands, Micronesia, American Samoa, and Northern Marianas Islands.  Funds also are awarded for the Hatch Multistate Research Fund as a separate allocation and on a formula basis.  A 100 percent non-federal match is required for all recipients except for the District of Columbia and Insular Area institutions, which are required to provide a 50 percent non-federal match.  Approximately 25 percent of these funds support Multistate Research Fund Projects selected through a scientific peer-review process.  The States are required to spend a certain amount on integrated activities.

Contact: Hatch (Regular) – Marty Draper and Steven Smith; Hatch Multistate – Herb Bolton
CFDA Number: 10.203

McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research Program. 16 U.S.C. 582a, et seq. McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry allocates funds on a formula basis for forestry research, which includes forests and related rangelands, to eligible 1862 and 1890 land-grant institutions and institutions offering graduate training in the sciences basic to forestry or having a forestry school. Eligible institutions are designated by the State. A 100 percent non-federal match is required.

Contact: Catalino Blanche
CFDA Number: 10.202

Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA). 16 U.S.C. 1671 et seq. The Renewable Resources Extension Act provides funding for extension efforts in forest and range resources. Funds are distributed on a formula basis to the 1862 and 1890 land-grant institutions to address forest and rangeland stewardship and health, invasive species, economic opportunities, and fish and wildlife resource issues.

Contact: Eric Norland
CFDA Number: 10.500

Smith-Lever: 1862 Institution Cooperative Extension Formula Grants. 7 U.S.C. 341. The Smith-Lever Act sections 3(b) and (c) allocate federal funds on a formula basis to support cooperative extension work in 50 States, Puerto Rico, Guam, Virgin Islands, Micronesia, American Samoa, and Northern Mariana Islands.  The District of Columbia receives extension funds through separate legislative authority. The States are required to spend a certain amount on both integrated and multistate activities.  A 100 percent non-federal match is required for all recipients except for Insular Area institutions, which are required to provide a 50 percent non-federal match, although the Secretary may waive the match above 50 percent if an institution demonstrates that it is unable to meet that requirement.  The District of Columbia is not required to provide a non-federal match.

Contact: Denis Ebodaghe and Monte Johnson
CFDA Number: 10.500

Tribal Colleges Endowment Fund. 7 U.S.C. 301 note. This fund distributes the interest earned by an endowment established for the 34 1994 land-grant institutions. The Endowment Fund enhances education in agricultural sciences and related disciplines for Native Americans by building educational capacity at these institutions in the areas of curricula design and materials development, faculty development and preparation for teaching, instruction delivery systems, experiential learning, equipment and instrumentation for teaching, and student recruitment and retention. It also funds facility renovation, repair, construction and maintenance in support of these efforts. At the end of each fiscal year, the earned interest income from the endowment fund is distributed according to a statutory formula.

Contact: Tim Grosser
CFDA Number: 10.222

Tribal Colleges Education Equity Grants. 7 U.S.C. 301 note. These grants promote and strengthen higher education instruction in the food and agricultural sciences at the 34 1994 land-grant institutions. Project proposals focus on undergraduate and/or graduate studies in the food and agricultural sciences in one or more of the following areas: Curricula Design and Materials Development, Faculty Development and Preparation for Teaching, Instruction Delivery Systems, Student Experiential Learning, Equipment and Instrumentation for Teaching, or Student Recruitment and Retention. Funds are allocated on a formula basis.

Contact: Tim Grosser
CFDA Number: 10.221

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NON-COMPETITIVE GRANT PROGRAMS

Food and Agriculture Defense Initiative. 7 U.S.C. 3351. The initiative supports a national diagnostic network of public agricultural institutions which identifies and responds to high-risk biological pathogens in the food and agriculture system. NIFA directly funds twenty eight individual animal laboratories and five plant diagnostic centers, dispersed strategically around the country. The diagnostic laboratories are responsible for identification of exotic and domestic pests and pathogens that are of concern to the security of our food and other agricultural production systems. Additionally, the Food and Agricultural Defense Initiative provides funding for the Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN). EDEN provides a clearinghouse of educational materials for disaster response and other agricultural homeland security information.

Contact: William Hoffman
CFDA Number: 10.304

Non-competitive Special Research Grants. 7 U.S.C. 450i(c). Recipients of non-competitive special research grants are specified by Congress in the appropriations act. Eligibility for non-competitive special grants is generally limited to land-grant universities.

Contact: Meryl Broussard
CFDA Number: 10.500

 

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